eruditio et religio

Hello everyone!

I just got back from my first official college visit to Duke University in North Carolina.

My dad graduated from Duke so the visit was especially meaningful. I understand why this place holds such a special place in his heart because I LOVED it there. The campus is beautiful and buzzing with life.

Duke’s motto is “eruditio et religio” which means “erudition and religion.” An erudite person shows knowledge that is gained through meticulous studying. The Latin prefix e- means out, and rudis- means rough. This could mean that the university will literally transform students from rough or undeveloped into wise and knowledgeable people. Religio- (religion or faith) is possibly referring to Duke’s Methodist background.

Many colleges and universities have mottos that are written in Latin. After a quick search, I discovered that universities all over the world have Latin mottos showing that the language is indeed alive and well.

What is the motto of the college/university you attended? If you’re not in college yet, what is the motto of the college you would like to attend? 🙂

Looking forward to hearing your mottos; please be sure to comment!

Name That Animal: Challenge #8

What would you name this magnificent creature? Photo via galleryhip.com

It’s about time for a Name That Animal Challenge!

Pretend that you are a scientist and you have just discovered this new species and you have the privilege of naming it. Scientists usually name new species by using Greek or/and Latin roots because the prefixes, stems, and suffixes are just like building blocks that you can utilize in countless ways.

Your challenge is to name the strange animal in the picture above using your knowledge of Greek and Latin roots. Keep in mind that you can use characteristics like size, color, or shape to name this animal. Feel free to search my blog to find root words to help you or use the list below!

Greek:

cyno-                                                dog

hydro-                                              water

cephal-                                             head

enalio-                                              sea

-cephaly                                           head

-soma-                                              body

somato-                                            body

oceano-                                            sea

-delphus                                          dolphin, womb

 

Latin:

cani-                                                  dog

-corp-                                                body

mari-, mar-                                     sea/ocean

-capit-                                               head

aqua-, aquato-                              water

-delphin-                                         dolphin

The letter “o” is the most common way to link Greek roots, and the letter “i” is used to link Latin roots. However, you can do whatever you like and enjoy!

If you haven’t already done so, be sure to check out Name That Animal Challenge #1, Name That Animal Challenge #2, Name That Animal Challenge #3, Name That Animal Challenge #4Name That Animal Challenge #5, and Name That Animal Challenge #6.

Harry Potter Characters – Xenophilius Lovegood

Xenophilius Lovegood is the eccentric and loving father of Luna in the Harry Potter series. (image from pottermore.com)

J.K. Rowling is a master of using charactonyms, names that suggest a distinctive trait of a fictional character, throughout the Harry Potter series. Xenophilius Lovegood is the
eccentric father of Luna and the editor of the Quibbler, a publication filled with alternative takes on the events of the wizarding world.

The name Xenophilius comes from the Greek roots xeno- meaning foreign/strange, and -phil meaning love of. From this charactonym, we can assume Xenophilius is drawn to all manner of strange or unusual objects.

The first time we meet Xenophilius is at Bill and Fleur’s wedding when he arrives dressed in “a cap whose tassel dangled in front of his nose, and robes of an eye-watering shade of egg-yolk yellow” (Pg 139). Xenophilius lives in a “most strange-looking house” and fills it with unusual and rare objects, like the Erumpent Horn, “an enormous gray spiral horn, not unlike that of a unicorn” (Pg 401). He possesses unusual knowledge, such as the fact that “gnome saliva is enormously beneficial” (Pg 140) and has even “done a lot of research on Gernumbli magic” (Pg 141). Indeed, Xenophilius is an apt name for this character!

*Quotes cited from Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows by J.K. Rowling.

 

 

 

Guayaquil (gwī-ə-ˈkēl)

My family and I recently came back from a brilliant trip to Ecuador. We spent most of our time in the Galapagos Archipelago but we were able to spend some time in  Guayaquil. Although Quito is the political capital of Ecuador, Guayaquil is the main trade and financial center of the country. Guayaquil is a bustling city of 4 million people who speak Spanish, Quechua and many other indigenous languages.

During a city tour of Guayaquil, our guide told us the fascinating tale of the origin of this beautiful city’s name. It is said that Guayaquil comes from Guayas, a brave Indian chief, and Quil, his beloved wife. Refusing to surrender to the Spanish conquistadors, Guayas killed his wife and then drowned himself – they would rather die than be ruled by the Spanish.  Francisco de Orellana, a Spanish conquistador is credited with putting down the native rebellions and founding the city of Guayaquil on July 25, 1538. We were lucky to be there during the city’s Founding Day celebrations and witnessed many special events throughout the city commemorating the special occasion.

I love the story of Guayas and Quil but it is interesting to note that Guayaquil could also come from the aboriginal roots Gua (large), Ya (House), and Quil (Our) meaning “our big house.” Whatever the origin of the name, Guayaquil is an interesting city with a complex history.

If you watched the 2018 Scripps Spelling Bee, you may remember that Guayaquil was used in the Finals. I hope you enjoyed this post and pictures!