Guayaquil (gwī-ə-ˈkēl)

My family and I recently came back from a brilliant trip to Ecuador. We spent most of our time in the Galapagos Archipelago but we were able to spend some time in  Guayaquil. Although Quito is the political capital of Ecuador, Guayaquil is the main trade and financial center of the country. Guayaquil is a bustling city of 4 million people who speak Spanish, Quechua and many other indigenous languages.

During a city tour of Guayaquil, our guide told us the fascinating tale of the origin of this beautiful city’s name. It is said that Guayaquil comes from Guayas, a brave Indian chief, and Quil, his beloved wife. Refusing to surrender to the Spanish conquistadors, Guayas killed his wife and then drowned himself – they would rather die than be ruled by the Spanish.  Francisco de Orellana, a Spanish conquistador is credited with putting down the native rebellions and founding the city of Guayaquil on July 25, 1538. We were lucky to be there during the city’s Founding Day celebrations and witnessed many special events throughout the city commemorating the special occasion.

I love the story of Guayas and Quil but it is interesting to note that Guayaquil could also come from the aboriginal roots Gua (large), Ya (House), and Quil (Our) meaning “our big house.” Whatever the origin of the name, Guayaquil is an interesting city with a complex history.

If you watched the 2018 Scripps Spelling Bee, you may remember that Guayaquil was used in the Finals. I hope you enjoyed this post and pictures!

2018 Scripps National Spelling Bee – The Journey Ends

The best part of Bee Week is reconnecting with old friends and making new ones. Source: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images North America.

Hello everyone!

Bee Week 2018 has officially come to an end and I’ve had a few days to reflect upon my experiences over the last six years. I first qualified for the Bee when I was seven years old so I’ve been involved with this event for nearly half my life!

My goal every year has been to increase my knowledge and improve my ranking and I am proud to say that I have achieved that. This year, I was named a Championship Finalist and tied for 10th place. I may not have won the National Spelling Bee, but sometimes it’s not the result that matters as much as the process. I’ve not only learned words that will stay with me for the rest of my life, I’ve also learned the value of persistence, hard work, and resilience. All of these lessons will help me succeed in the next phase of my life.

Thank you to everyone who supported me during my journey especially my parents, who devoted so much time and energy to help me reach my goals. Thank you to my sister Anya for her patience and love, and thank you to Coco for always making me smile with her antics and distinct duende.

Lastly, I’d like to thank Scott Remer, a former National Spelling Bee participant and the author of Words of Wisdom, who coached me this last year and kept things in perspective for me.

Please check back for more photos in the upcoming weeks!

 

 

2018 Scripps National Spelling Bee – Opening Ceremony

2018 Scripps National Spelling Bee Opening Ceremony.

Hello everyone!

Tonight the 2018 Scripps National Spelling Bee officially kicked off with the Bee’s Opening Ceremony! I was honored to be a part of this year’s ceremony as a representative of one of the seven core values of the Bee – inspiring growth. Other values include purpose, achievement, entertainment, potential, discovery, and heritage. During the ceremony, Dr. Bailly, the official pronouncer of the Bee, highlighted the fact that my blogging was inspiring others to grow in their knowledge as I have grown during my five year journey at the Bee. Indeed, that was my hope for this blog and I hope I have succeeded in that endeavor.

Over the past three years, I have written about my Bee experiences in my Insider’s Guide to the Scripps National Spelling Bee. However, this year I have decided to forego this tradition and simply enjoy my last time at the Bee (I’m an 8th grader and will no longer be able to compete after this year).

The National Spelling Bee is a great event and I hope you all get a chance to watch it this year; my speller number is 133! If you are competing in the Bee this year, good luck!

Additional information and broadcasting schedule can be found on http://www.spellingbee.com.

eradicate (ə̇ˈradəˌkāt) vs. irradicate (ə̇ˈradə̇ˌkāt)

Hello everyone! To continue our homonym theme, let’s take a look at this confusing pair of homophones – eradicate and irradicate. You may remember from an earlier post that homophones are words that sound the same, but are spelled differently.

Both eradicate and irradicate come from the Latin word radix, which means root. However, these words have opposite meanings due to their prefixes. Eradicate contains the Latin prefix e- which means out of, giving rise to its meaning “to uproot” or “root out”. One could use the word “eradicate” in terms of a cure for a disease (the disease was completely eradicated).

Irradicate on the other hand means to root deeply within. It refers to something that cannot be “rooted out” or “destroyed.” This word has gone through assimilation, the process by which the final letter of the prefix is dropped, and the first letter of the root is doubled. In this case, the prefix “in” (meaning in or within), has changed to ir-radicate. Even though assimilation has occurred, the meaning of the original prefix remains. Assimilation often occurs with words derived from Latin in which a prefix is linked to a root. 

I hope you enjoyed reading about this interesting pair of words!