doraphobia (dōrəˈfōbēə)

Happy Halloween from Coco! (for more pictures of Coco, please visit her Instagram @ladycococuddles)

Happy Halloween! In the past I have explored phobias during the month of October, and I thought I would continue the theme today.

Doraphobia is the fear of touching the fur of an animal. It comes from the Greek roots dora- meaning fur, and -phobia meaning abnormal fear of. Doraphobia is not the fear of the popular Nickelodeon television character who explores the world with her trusty companions, Mr. Map, Mochila, and Boots!

Do any of you have doraphobia or any other phobias?

To explore other Halloween related posts, search my blog with the key words “halloween” and “creature feature.”

eruditio et religio

Hello everyone!

I just got back from my first official college visit to Duke University in North Carolina.

My dad graduated from Duke so the visit was especially meaningful. I understand why this place holds such a special place in his heart because I LOVED it there. The campus is beautiful and buzzing with life.

Duke’s motto is “eruditio et religio” which means “erudition and religion.” An erudite person shows knowledge that is gained through meticulous studying. The Latin prefix e- means out, and rudis- means rough. This could mean that the university will literally transform students from rough or undeveloped into wise and knowledgeable people. Religio- (religion or faith) is possibly referring to Duke’s Methodist background.

Many colleges and universities have mottos that are written in Latin. After a quick search, I discovered that universities all over the world have Latin mottos showing that the language is indeed alive and well.

What is the motto of the college/university you attended? If you’re not in college yet, what is the motto of the college you would like to attend? 🙂

Looking forward to hearing your mottos; please be sure to comment!

Name That Animal: Challenge #8

What would you name this magnificent creature? Photo via galleryhip.com

It’s about time for a Name That Animal Challenge!

Pretend that you are a scientist and you have just discovered this new species and you have the privilege of naming it. Scientists usually name new species by using Greek or/and Latin roots because the prefixes, stems, and suffixes are just like building blocks that you can utilize in countless ways.

Your challenge is to name the strange animal in the picture above using your knowledge of Greek and Latin roots. Keep in mind that you can use characteristics like size, color, or shape to name this animal. Feel free to search my blog to find root words to help you or use the list below!

Greek:

cyno-                                                dog

hydro-                                              water

cephal-                                             head

enalio-                                              sea

-cephaly                                           head

-soma-                                              body

somato-                                            body

oceano-                                            sea

-delphus                                          dolphin, womb

 

Latin:

cani-                                                  dog

-corp-                                                body

mari-, mar-                                     sea/ocean

-capit-                                               head

aqua-, aquato-                              water

-delphin-                                         dolphin

The letter “o” is the most common way to link Greek roots, and the letter “i” is used to link Latin roots. However, you can do whatever you like and enjoy!

If you haven’t already done so, be sure to check out Name That Animal Challenge #1, Name That Animal Challenge #2, Name That Animal Challenge #3, Name That Animal Challenge #4Name That Animal Challenge #5, and Name That Animal Challenge #6.

Harry Potter Characters – Xenophilius Lovegood

Xenophilius Lovegood is the eccentric and loving father of Luna in the Harry Potter series. (image from pottermore.com)

J.K. Rowling is a master of using charactonyms, names that suggest a distinctive trait of a fictional character, throughout the Harry Potter series. Xenophilius Lovegood is the
eccentric father of Luna and the editor of the Quibbler, a publication filled with alternative takes on the events of the wizarding world.

The name Xenophilius comes from the Greek roots xeno- meaning foreign/strange, and -phil meaning love of. From this charactonym, we can assume Xenophilius is drawn to all manner of strange or unusual objects.

The first time we meet Xenophilius is at Bill and Fleur’s wedding when he arrives dressed in “a cap whose tassel dangled in front of his nose, and robes of an eye-watering shade of egg-yolk yellow” (Pg 139). Xenophilius lives in a “most strange-looking house” and fills it with unusual and rare objects, like the Erumpent Horn, “an enormous gray spiral horn, not unlike that of a unicorn” (Pg 401). He possesses unusual knowledge, such as the fact that “gnome saliva is enormously beneficial” (Pg 140) and has even “done a lot of research on Gernumbli magic” (Pg 141). Indeed, Xenophilius is an apt name for this character!

*Quotes cited from Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows by J.K. Rowling.

 

 

 

2018 Scripps National Spelling Bee – The Journey Ends

The best part of Bee Week is reconnecting with old friends and making new ones. Source: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images North America.

Hello everyone!

Bee Week 2018 has officially come to an end and I’ve had a few days to reflect upon my experiences over the last six years. I first qualified for the Bee when I was seven years old so I’ve been involved with this event for nearly half my life!

My goal every year has been to increase my knowledge and improve my ranking and I am proud to say that I have achieved that. This year, I was named a Championship Finalist and tied for 10th place. I may not have won the National Spelling Bee, but sometimes it’s not the result that matters as much as the process. I’ve not only learned words that will stay with me for the rest of my life, I’ve also learned the value of persistence, hard work, and resilience. All of these lessons will help me succeed in the next phase of my life.

Thank you to everyone who supported me during my journey especially my parents, who devoted so much time and energy to help me reach my goals. Thank you to my sister Anya for her patience and love, and thank you to Coco for always making me smile with her antics and distinct duende.

Lastly, I’d like to thank Scott Remer, a former National Spelling Bee participant and the author of Words of Wisdom, who coached me this last year and kept things in perspective for me.

Please check back for more photos in the upcoming weeks!