augurey (ȯ-gyərē)

The augurey is a greenish-black bird that was once thought to foretell death. (image from playbuzz.com)

According to Newt Scamander, author of Fantastic Beasts and Where To Find Them, the Augurey is a bird that primarily dwells in Britain and Ireland. This bird resembles a small, malnourished, greenish-black vulture. This melancholic bird is very shy and only comes out of its tear-shaped nest during heavy rains.

One can distinguish an Augurey by its low, throbbing cry that was once believed to foreshadow death. However, researchers have refuted that idea, and have discovered that the Augurey only sings when rain is approaching. The Ministry of Magic classifies the Augurey as XX, meaning that it is harmless and can be domesticated.

The bird’s name probably comes from the word “augury,” which is the practice of interpreting the flight patterns of birds. Romans believed that the gods expressed their will through various signs in nature. They believed that nothing important should be done without the blessing of the gods so they appointed augurs, a special group of priests, to divine the will of the gods by observing and interpreting the signals of birds.  “Augur” comes from the Latin word “auspex”, which literally means “one who takes signs from the birds.”

Come back next week for another fantastic beast!

1 Comment

  1. I suspect that the phrase “to augur well or bad” comes from the word “augur?”

    In ancient Rome, a religious official who observed natural signs interpreted the behavior of birds as an indication of divine approval or disapproval of a proposed action.

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